Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Three Tips for Test Driving Used Cars

Buying used is a great way to secure a vehicle yourself at an affordable price, but there are risks involved as well. The biggest risk is that you end up purchasing a lemon of a car with all sorts of problems that will be annoying to live with and expensive to fix. Most people would never buy a used car without first taking it for a test drive; this is your opportunity to see for yourself how the car drives. It’s not enough to merely drive the car a few blocks, you need to really pay attention and put the vehicle to work. Ask for a test drive on any used vehicle at Hendrick Buick GMC Cadillac and follow a few tips, and you can get a good idea of what kind of shape the car is in.

Listen
As you drive the car, pay close attention to all the sounds that the car makes. In other words, don’t do a test drive with the radio on. Listen for any strange sounds as you accelerate and the car changes gear, when you’re braking, and when you’re turning. If you notice a sound that you’re concerned about, bring it up when you get back to the dealership. The dealership may be willing to have it looked at and fixed before selling you the vehicle.

Feel
You also want to get a good idea of how the car feels and handles. Driving your car at low speeds around a residential area isn’t going to give you any clues as to how it will fare at higher speeds. Every test drive should include getting on and off a freeway. The freeway entrance ramp is a great place to test acceleration, and you want to make sure the engine, steering, or other components work at the highest speeds you’ll be driving. Just make sure you don’t get distracted and drive too far from the dealership.

Get a Professional Opinion
When test driving a vehicle from Hendrick Buick GMC Cadillac or other used car dealer, ask if you can have a mechanic look at it. You want a third-party professional to check the major components and make sure the vehicle is in good working order. Most dealers will give their consent to have the car looked at, and if they don’t, you should be wary of purchasing from that particular dealer. Only take this step if you are very serious about purchasing the car, as a mechanic will usually charge around $100 to inspect a car. 


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